Quotes

Quotes about Virtue


Virtue is not malicious; wrong done her
Is righted even when men grant they err.

George Chapman

O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies
In herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities:
For nought so vile that on the earth doth live
But to the earth some special good doth give,
Nor aught so good but strain'd from that fair use
Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse;
Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied;
And vice sometimes by action dignified.

William Shakespeare

The chariest maid is prodigal enough,
If she unmask her beauty to the moon:
Virtue itself'scapes not calumnious strokes:
The canker galls the infants of the spring
Too oft before their buttons be disclosed,
And in the morn and liquid dew of youth
Contagious blastments are most imminent.

William Shakespeare

Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful.

William Shakespeare

Virtue is like precious odours,--most fragrant when they are incensed or crushed.

Francis Bacon

Virtue is like a rich stone,--best plain set.

Francis Bacon

Abash'd the devil stood,
And felt how awful goodness is, and saw
Virtue in her shape how lovely.

John Milton

Thrones, Dominations, Princedoms, Virtues, Powers.

John Milton

Virtue could see to do what virtue would
By her own radiant light, though sun and moon
Were in the flat sea sunk. And Wisdom's self
Oft seeks to sweet retired solitude,
Where with her best nurse Contemplation
She plumes her feathers and lets grow her wings,
That in the various bustle of resort
Were all-to ruffled, and sometimes impair'd.
He that has light within his own clear breast
May sit i' th' centre and enjoy bright day;
But he that hides a dark soul and foul thoughts
Benighted walks under the midday sun.

John Milton

Or if Virtue feeble were,
Heav'n itself would stoop to her.

John Milton

But wild Ambition loves to slide, not stand,
And Fortune's ice prefers to Virtue's land.

John Dryden

Pygmies are pygmies still, though percht on Alps;
And pyramids are pyramids in vales.
Each man makes his own stature, builds himself.
Virtue alone outbuilds the Pyramids;
Her monuments shall last when Egypt's fall.

Edward Young

Know then this truth (enough for man to know),--
"Virtue alone is happiness below."

Alexander Pope

Virtue she finds too painful an endeavour,
Content to dwell in decencies forever.

Alexander Pope

Careless their merits or their faults to scan,
His pity gave ere charity began.
Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride,
And even his failings lean'd to Virtue's side.

Oliver Goldsmith

No radiant pearl which crested Fortune wears,
No gem that twinkling hangs from Beauty's ears,
Not the bright stars which Night's blue arch adorn,
Nor rising suns that gild the vernal morn,
Shine with such lustre as the tear that flows
Down Virtue's manly cheek for others' woes.

Erasmus Darwin

Badness, look you, you may choose easily in a heap: level is the path, and right near it dwells. But before Virtue the immortal gods have put the sweat of man's brow; and long and steep is the way to it, and rugged at the first.

Hesiod

The universe exists and somebody had to make it. The whole complex movement of the universe represents order. The Creator loves order and hates chaos. Virtue is order. Sin is chaos ... The sinner often doesn't understand the extent to which he destroys order ... The soul dedicated to order joins the ultimate divine order

But wild Ambition loves to slide, not stand, And Fortune's ice prefers to Virtue's land.

John Dryden

Virtue itself scapes not calumnious strokes.

William Shakespeare

Praise her but for this her without-door form-- Which on my faith deserves high speech--and straight The shrug, the hum or ha, these pretty brands That calumny doth use--O, I am out, That mercy does, for calumny will sear Virtue itself--these shrugs, these hums and ha's, When you have said she's goodly, come between Ere you can say she's honest.

William Shakespeare

Abashed the Devil stood, And felt how awful goodness is, and saw Virtue in her own shape how lovely; saw And pined his loss.

John Milton

A man's indebtedness is not virtue; his repayment is. Virtue begins when he dedicates himself actively to the job of gratitude.

Ruth Benedict

Neuer thinke you fortune can beare the sway, Where Virtue's force, can cause her to obay.

Elizabeth I

Virtue is its own reward.

Anthony Cicero

Fond man! though all the heroes of your line Bedeck your halls, and round your galleries shine In proud display; yet take this truth from me-- Virtue alone is true nobility!

Juvenal (Decimus Junius Juvenal)

Virtue is not the absense of vices or the avoidance of moral dangers; virtue is a vivid and separate ting, like pain or a particular smell. - Tremendous Trifles.

G. K. Chesterton

Virtue herself is her own fairest reward. - Punica.

Silius Italicus

Pleasure the servant, Virtue looking on.

Ben Jonson

Pygmies are pygmies still, though percht on Alps; And pyramids are pyramids in vales. Each man makes his own stature, builds himself. Virtue alone outbuilds the Pyramids; Her monuments shall last when Egypt's fall. -Edward Young.

Edward Young

Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful. -Measure for Measure. Act iii. Sc. 1.

William Shakespeare

No radiant pearl, which crested Fortune wears, No gem that twinkling hangs from Beauty's wars. Not the bright stars which Night's blue arch adorn, Nor rising suns that gild the vernal morn, Shine with such lustre as the tear that flows Down Virtue's manly cheek for others' woes.

Erasmus Darwin

Virtue is insufficient temptation.

George Bernard Shaw

Virtue, I grant you, is an empty boast; But shall the dignity of vice be lost?

Alexander Pope

One should judge a man mainly from his depravities. Virtues can be faked. Depravities are real.

Klaus Kinski

Virtue and sense are one; and, trust me, still A faithless heart betrays the head unsound.

John Armstrong

Virtue, the strength and beauty of the soul, Is the best gift of Heaven: a happiness That even above the smiles and frowns of fate Exalts great Nature's favourites: a wealth That ne'er encumbers, nor can be transferr'd.

John Armstrong

Virtue is like a rich stone, best plain set.

Francis Bacon

Virtue alone is the unerring sign of a noble soul. [Fr., La vertu d'un coeur noble est la marque certaine.]

Nicolas Boileau-Despreaux

Virtue is not malicious; wrong done her Is righted even when men grant they err.

George Chapman

Virtue is a habit of the mind, consistent with nature and moderation and reason.

Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero)

Virtue is indeed its own reward. [Lat., Ipsa quidem pretium virtus sibi.]

Claudian (Claudianus)

Virtue when concealed is a worthless thing. [Lat., Vile latens virtus.]

Claudian (Claudianus)

Virtue is not left to stand alone. He who practices it will have neighbors.

Wilkie (William) Confucius

Virtue cannot separate itself from reality without becoming a principle of evil.

Albert Camus

Virtue is the only true nobility.

Thomas Fuller

Virtue by premeditation isn't worth much.

Georg C. Lichtenberg

Virtue is a sure anchor.

Michel Eyquem De Motto

Virtue is a state of war, and to live in it we have always to combat with ourselves.

Jean Jacques Rousseau

Virtue is more to be feared than vice, because its excesses are not subject to the regulation of conscience.

Adam Smith

Virtue is its own reward. There's a pleasure in doing good which sufficiently pays itself.

Sir John Vanbrugh

Virtue is not the absense of vices or the avoidance of moral dangers; virtue is a vivid and separate thing, like pain or a particular smell.

G. K. Chesterton

Virtue is insufficient temptation.

George Bernard Shaw

Virtue is more to be feared than vice, because its excesses are not subject to the restraints of conscience.

Albert J. Nock

Virtue is a state of war, and to live in it we have always to combat with ourselves.

Jean Jacques Rousseau

Virtue treads paths that end not in the grave.

James Russell Lowell

Virtue must be valuable, if men and women of all degrees pretend to have it.

Ed Howe

Virtue consists, not in abstaining from vice, but in not desiring it.

George Bernard Shaw

O Washington! thrice glorious name, What due rewards can man decree-- Empires are far below thy aim, And scepters have no charms for thee; Virtue alone has your regards, And she must be your great reward.

Philip Freneau

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